LAND2

Geraldine Finn: One Time Alone – Improvisation Takes Place

Geraldine Finn

The text was orignally composed for

The Serbian music/ology journal New Sound

1. One time alone Improvisation Takes place

Lays hold of with the hand(s) Or other parts of the body Or with any instrument

Grasps seizes Captures catches

By pursuit Or surprise

Captivates Wins Gains

(As)

Take it between Your finger and thumb

Take it up With the tongs

Take the bull By the horns

Deuce Take it

Take the bit Between your teeth

Take a fortress By storm

Take the odd trick

Take £40 a week Take the biscuit Takes my fancy 1

2. Improvisation Takes Place

There

Where there was No place

U-topia

3. Here There Where there was

Where there is No place

Part of space Occupied By person or thing 2

Improvisation Takes place

One time alone

Seizes captures Catches grasps

Lays hold of with the hands Or other part of the body

Arms legs teeth feet lungs Lips larynx throat tongue

Improvisation Captivates Wins

Gains Place There

There Where there was No place

Place of improvisation Improvisation of place

Always already a trace Always already displaced

Giving place To the invention Of the other 3

To come

Unforeseeable

In the space Between

One trace And An other

4. At this very moment In this place Here I am 4

Improvising

With a pencil

Already a trace Already displaced

Seeking my place Of improvisation Of place

In response To the call Of the other

Not speaking Writing reciting From an already identifiable place 5

Feeling my way Here

Here on Off the page

With a pencil Toward an addressable thou 6

Toward an addressable Here and now 7

In words In writing In music In speech

With no recipes And no nets

Without a model Without direction Without a prescriptive form 8

Poetry Philosophy Music

Writing Speech

Composition Analysis Performance

Theory Theatre Song

Neither One All

None And Other

One time alone Destined For the other

5. The most difficult thing Is the invention of the tone

And with the tone The scene that can be staged

That you That we

Can let be staged Here

Here on Off the page

The pose that adopts you (me) As much as you (I we) adopt it 9

The tone being precisely that Which establishes the relation 10

It isn’t the content It’s the tone

Everything is summoned From an intonation

And even earlier still In what gives its tone To the tone

A rhythm

(One time alone)

I think that all in all It is upon rhythm That I stake everything 11

6. One time alone Circumcision Takes place 12

It’s all there In six words

And the space Between

Intonation Rhythm Image Idea

Content Context Form

Like the sound of the sea Deep within a shell 13

What underlying scansion Of the world Does it embody 14

One time alone Circumcision Takes place

Giving place

To the trace Of the other To come

There Where there was

Where there is No place

U-topia What reading Writing Speaking singing Citing re-citing

Will ever make it heard 15

In a word

No pasaran

Shibboleth For Paul Celan

Someone who Overarced by stars That are human handiwork

And who shelterless In this till now Undreamt of sense And thus most uncannily In the open

Goes with his very being To language

Stricken by And seeking Reality 16

7. Landscape with urn beings Conversations from smokemouth to smokemouth.

They eat the bedlamite truffle, a piece of unburied poesy, found tongue and tooth.

A tear rolls back into its eye.

The orphaned left half of the pilgrim shell – they gave you it, then trussed you up – illumines the space and listens:

the clinker game against death can begin.17

One time Alone Improvisation

Takes place Makes place

There

Where there is Where there was

No place

8. The reader too Must improvise 18

hör dich ein mit dem Mund

Hear deep in With your mouth 19

Take breath And read it With the ears 20

Listen with lips and limbs And throat and tongue

Absorb its movement 21 With larynx and lungs

What underlying scansion Of the world Does it embody

Speak you too, speak as the last, say out your say.

Speak – But don’t split off No from Yes Give your say this meaning too: give it the shadow

Give it shadow enough, give it as much as you know is spread round you from midnight to midday and midnight.

Look around: see how thing all come alive – By death! Alive! Speaks true who speaks shadow.22

Speaks true Who speaks Shadow

Place of improvisation

Always already Displaced

Improvisation of place

Always already A trace

Which does not belong 23

No more sand art, no sand book, no masters. Nothing on the dice. How many mutes? Seventeen.

Your question – your answer. Your song, what does it know Deepinsnow, Eepinnow, E – i – o. 24

9. The Gardens of Sampson and Beasley 25

Under Orion’s starry sky
I lie in the moonlit garden
Wondering where to cast my eye
For all that I see is heaven
Oh why does it have to end?
I wish we could still pretend
You’re near – just around the bend
In the gardens of Sampson and Beasley

Last time we were in this place
Your face had a certain sadness
And oh how I’ve wondered since
What you’ve done with all that sadness
Oh why did it have to end?
I wish we could still pretend
Our love was around the bend
In the gardens of Sampson and Beasley

Under Orion’s starry sky
I lie in the moonlit garden
Wondering when I close my eyes
If I’ll ever find my heaven
Oh why will it never end?
These days where I still pretend
Our love – just around the bend
In the gardens of Sampson and Beasley

10. There is no one

Improvisation

Of rhythm
Of tone
Of place

There is
No place
U-topia

Which is not
Always already
A trace

Displaced

Of an other
Improvisation
Of place

We must begin
Wherever we are

Wherever we are
In a text

Where we already
Believe ourselves
To be 26

Under Orion’s starry sky

Overarced by stars
That are human handiwork

In the gardens
Of Sampson and Beasley

Perhaps

Maybe
Or not

As the case
May be

11. The essential thing

Is to set the song in motion
As a graft

[Shoot or scion
Inserted in a slit of another stock
From which it receives sap
Piece of transplanted living tissue
Process of grafting
Place where graft is inserted
Hard work] 27

And not
As a meaning
A work
Or a spectacle 28

Poems in this sense too
Are underway
They are making toward something

Something standing open
Occupiable

Perhaps toward an addressable Thou
Toward an addressable reality 29

Paths on which
Language gets a voice

Creaturely paths
Sketches of existence
Perhaps

A sending oneself
Toward oneself
In search of oneself

A kind of homecoming 30

12. Perhaps

Maybe
Or
Not

That is
As the case
May be

There is
No place

U-topia

Part of space
Occupied
By person or thing

Like
Home

Your place
Or mine

Always
Only
A trace

Of improvisation
Of place

Remains
In the gift
Of the other

13. Meanwhile

All across Rwanda

Murder murder murder murder
Murder murder murder murder murder … 31

And this too is improvisation

Place of improvisation
Improvisation of place

Eight hundred thousand
Killed in a hundred days 32

The most efficient mass killing
Since the atomic bombings
Of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 33

The only place In Rwanda
Where as many as a thousand people
Who were supposed to be killed
Gathered in concentration 34

And survived

Was the four-star luxury
Hôtel des Mille Collines
In the capital Kigali

Thanks to the guile
Of its caretaker manager
Paul Rusesabagina

Who bartered fine cheeses
Wine cognac and beer
To keep the killers at bay 35

“Each time
They menaced the hotel
He called the army officers
He opened the cellars
And he distributed the wine
And the champagne” 36

“What Paul did was extraordinary
He gave us the hotel for free
When the water in the pool ran out
He sent a lorry to get more water
I don’t know where from” 37

“I was using drinks
To corrupt people” 38

He said
And laughed

Because the people
He was corrupting

Were the Hutu Power leaders

Génocidaires

And what he meant
By corrupting them

Was feeding them liquor

So they wouldn’t
Kill the refugees
Under his roof

Paul sought to save
Everybody he could

And if that meant negotiating
With everybody who wanted to kill them

Génocidaires

So be it 39

“Everybody came
I had what they wanted
That was not my problem

My problem was
That nobody should be taken
Out of my hotel” 40

And nobody was

“Nobody was killed
Nobody was taken away
Nobody was beaten” 41

“What happened in Rwanda
Is now happening in Darfur
In the Congo

In all these places
They are butchering
Innocent civilians” 42

Gishyita
He explained
Had killed
Its people already

So there was peace 43

14. Improvisation

Takes
Place

One time
Alone

There

Where there is
Where there was

No place

U-topia

15. There is no place

Il n’y a pas

That is not
A trace

Of an improvisation
Of place

Remains

In the gift
Of the other

A-venir

The future
To come

16. There is no improvisation

Il n’y a pas

That is not
Of a place
Displaced

Response

To the call
Of the other

Which is
Not one

The call of the other
Is the call to come

And that happens
Only in multiple voices 44

What reading writing
Speaking singing
Citing re-citing

In-citing

Will ever make it heard

The braided polyphony
Which is coiled up
In every voice 45

In every word

The music of voices

If there is any
I do not sign it

I cannot precisely
Have it at my disposal
Or in my control 46

I listen to it

It is the experience itself
Of impossible appropriation

The most joyous
And the most tragic

So

Let’s listen 47

17. Lonely Woman 48

18. It is the experience

Of impossible appropriation

The braided polyphony
Coiled up
In the voice

In what is given
In what is heard

It may give rise
To calculation

Representation
Regulation
Imitation

Notation

Pre-scription
Con-scription
In-scription

But in the final analysis
It ceases to be calculable 49

Improvisation
Takes place
But once

‘He also know
That he does not
‘Own’ it himself
Nor ‘invent’ it
But is responsible
To something given
To him’ 50

Es gibt 51

Music
Language
Home
Land

Remains

In the gift
Of the other

Which is not one
Which does not belong

19. There is no one

Improvisation

An inheritance
Is never gathered together

Its presumed unity
If there is one

Can consist only
In the injunction

To reaffirm
By choosing

One must filter
Sift criticize

One must sort out
Several different possibles
That inhabit the same conjuncture 52

Whether we will it
Or not
We are responsible 53

20. There is always

Improvisation

Of both means
And ends

In the space
Between

Experience
Understanding
Desire

What is
And
What is not

To be
Or not
To be

Between the idea
And the reality

Between the motion
And the act

Falls the Shadow 54

Speaks true
Who speaks
Shadow

Which is not one
Which does not belong
Which cannot be settled in advance

The aleatory advent
Of the entirely other

Beyond the incalculable
As a still possible calculus

Beyond the order
Of the calculus itself 55

Beyond the law
Of genre 56

Of names
Without remains

Of gender identity
Nation race

A place for everything
And everything in its place

Speaks true
Who speaks
Shadow

21. One time alone

Improvisation

Takes
Place

Seizes captures
Catches grasps
Lays hold of
With the hands

Arms legs feet teeth tongue
Throat larynx lips lungs

There

Where there was
Where there is

No place

U-topia

22. Ladies and gentleman

I am at the end
I am back at the beginning 57

Seeking my place
Of improvisation
Of place

Not speaking writing re-citing
From an already identifiable place

Feeling my way
Toward an addressable thou

Toward an addressable
Here and now

A trace
Already
Displaced

Remains

In the gift
Of the other
To come

After all
Is said
And done

The end is where
We start from 58

Topos research
By all means

But in light
Of what is
To be explored

In light of
U-topia 59

In light
Of the future
To come

Which cannot
Be settled
In advance

Which cannot
Be settled

Except
By death

That’s life

Improviser
Il le faut

Donc 60

Notes

 
1. ‘Lays hold of … my fancy’. From the entry under ‘take’ in The Concise Oxford Dictionary (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1929) pp. 1246-1247.
2. ‘Part of … thing’. From the entry under ‘place’ in The Concise Oxford Dictionary op.cit., p. 870.
3. Cf. Jacques Derrida, ‘Psyche: Invention of the Other’. Translated by Catherine Porter and Phillip Lewis. In Reading de Man Reading, edited by Wlad Godzich and Lindsay Waters (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1989): 25-65.
4. Cf. Jacques Derrida, ‘At This Very Moment in This Work Here I Am’. Translated by Ruben Berezdivin. In Re-Reading Levinas, edited by Robert Bernasconi and Simon Critchley (Bloomington Ill: Indiana University Press, 1992): 11-48.
5. Cf. Jacques Derrida: ‘I don’t know where I am when I give myself over to operations of this kind. I am there merely as someone who, like others, is seeking his place, and is not speaking from an already identifiable place’. From ‘Dialanguages’. In Points … Interviews, 1974 – 1994, edited by Elisabeth Weber (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995): 132 – 155, p. 135. Interview with Anne Berger, originally published in Fruits 1 (December 1983). ‘Here is how the interview was presented: “This conversation took place on September 27, 1983. It was understood that Jacques Derrida would improvise. Nothing was prepared and nothing has been reworked. We wanted to leave untouched what was a present of friendship”’. Cited in note to ‘Dialanguages’ in Points …, p.467.
6. Cf. Paul Celan: “Toward what? Toward something standing open, occupiable, perhaps toward an addressable Thou, toward an addressable reality”. From his ‘Speech on the Occasion of Receiving the Literature Prize of the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen’ (1958) (hereafter ‘Bremen Speech’). In Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan. Translated by John Felstiner (New York and London: W. W. Norton, 2000): 395-396, p.396.
7. Cf. John Coltrane: “I want to get to a point where I can feel the vibrations of a particular place at a particular moment and compose a song right there, on the spot – then throw it away.” (Juan-les-Pins, Côte d’Azur, July 27, 1965). Cited by Ashley Kahn in A Love Supreme. The Story of John Coltrane’s Signature Album (New York and London: Penguin Books, 2002), p.172.
8. Cf. Jacques Derrida: “Writing of the singular voice. Type, since there is inscription, typtein, timbre and tympanum, but without a type, that is to say, without a model, without a prescriptive form, types without “type”, and without a stereotype.” From ‘Voice II’ in Points … op. cit.: 156-170, p. 165. Correspondence with Verena Andermatt Conley, originally published in bilingual edition in boundary 2 (Winter 1984).
9. ‘The most difficult … adopt it’. Jacques Derrida (with alterations and additions), ‘Heidegger, the Philosophers’ Hell’ in Points … op. cit.: 181-190, p.188. Interview with Didier Eberon, originally published in Le Nouvel Observateur, November, 6-12, 1987.
10. ‘The tone … the tone’. Jacques Derrida, ‘The Spatial Arts: An Interview with Jacques Derrida’. In Deconstruction and the Visual Arts, edited by Peter Brunette and David Wills (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994): 9-32, p. 21.
11. ‘Everything … everything’. Jacques Derrida, Monolingualism of the Other: Or, The Prosthesis of Origin. Translated by Patrick Mensah (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998) p. 38.
12. Jacques Derrida, ‘Shibboleth. For Paul Celan’. In Word Traces: Readings of Paul Celan. Edited by Aris Fioretos (Baltimore: John Hopkins University, 1994): 3-72, p. 3.
13. ‘Like the sound … shell’. Jacques Derrida, Mémoires for Paul de Man. Translated by Cecile Lindsay, Jonathan Culler, Eduardo Cadava,, and Peggy Kamuf (New York: Columbia University Press, 1989) p.155.
14. ‘What underlying … embody’. Dennis Lee, Body Music (Toronto: Anansi, 1998) p. 206.
15. Cf. Jacques Derrida: “Forever unable to saturate a context, what reading will ever master this ‘on’ of ‘living on’?” From ‘Living On/Borderlines’ in Deconstruction and Criticism, edited by Harold Bloom et al. (New York: Seabury Press, 1979): 75-176, p. 76-77.
16. ‘Someone who … reality’. Paul Celan, ‘Bremen Speech’ in Selected Poems and Prose, op. cit. p. 396.
17. Paul Celan, ‘Landscape’, in Selected Poems and Prose, op. cit. p. 257.
18. Dennis Lee, Body Music, op. cit. p. 205.
19. “Hear deep in/with your mouth”. Concluding lines of Paul Celan, ‘The Shofar Place’ (Die Posaunenstelle). In Selected Poems and Prose, op. cit. p. 360-361.
20. Gerard Manley Hopkins, cited by John Pick in his ‘Introduction’ to A Hopkins Reader (New York: Doubleday, 1966) p. 26.
21. “You have to hear it out loud on the page. You have to absorb its movement with the eye, the inner ear and the body sense at once.” Dennis Lee, Body Music, op. cit., p. 212.
22. From ‘Speak you too’, Paul Celan, in Selected Poems and Prose op.cit. p. 77.
23. “Which does not belong.” Jacques Derrida, ‘Differance’ in Margins of Philosophy. Translated by Alan Bass (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1986) p. 22
24. ‘No more sand art’, Paul Celan, in Selected Poems and Prose op.cit. p. 251.
25. ‘The Gardens of Samson and Beasley’. Lyrics and music by China Forbes and Thomas M. Lauderdale. Track # 4 on Hang on Little Tomato by Pink Martini, Heinz Records 2004. (www.pinkmartini.com). Unfortunately, I was unable to get permission to include the audio version of this song in my paper for this site. I hope the reader will seek it out for themselves. It was certainly an important part of its inspiration.
26. ‘We must begin…to be’ Jacques Derrida, Of Grammatology Translated by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press 1976) p.162
27. From the entry under ‘graft’ in the Oxford English Dictionary.
28. ‘The essential … spectacle’. From Philippe Sollers, Numbers, cited by Jacques Derrida in Dissemination. Translated by Barbara Johnson (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1981) p.355.
29. ‘Poems…addressable reality’. Paul Celan, ‘Bremen Speech’ in Selected Poems and Prose op. cit. p.396.
30. ‘Paths … homecoming’. Paul Celan, ‘The Meridian. Speech on the Occasion of the Award of the George Buchner Prize’ (1961) (hereafter ‘Meridian’) in Selected Poems and Prose, op.cit.:401-414, p.412.
31. ‘Meanwhile … murder …’. Paul Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families. Stories from Rwanda (henceforth We Wish To Inform You). (London: Picador, 2000) p.133.
32. ‘Eight hundred … days’. Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op.cit. p.133.
33. ‘The most efficient … Nagasaki’. Philip Gourevitch, ‘Preface’, We Wish To Inform You, op.cit. np.
34. ‘The only place … concentration’. Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op.cit. p.134.
35. ‘Who bartered … at bay’. Jeevan Vasagar, ‘From Four Star Sanctuary to Star of Holywood: The Hotel that Saved Hundreds from Genocide’ (henceforth ‘Four Star Sanctuary’). The Guardian, Wednesday, February 16, 2005. (http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,12589,1415517,00.html).
36. Thomas Kamilindi, radio journalist in Kigali who fled to the Hôtel des Mille Collines on April 14, 1994, one week after the killing began. In Jeevan Vasagar, ‘From Four Star Sanctuary’ op.cit.
37. Thomas Kamilindi, op.cit.
38. Paul Rusesabagina, in Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op. cit. p.127.
39. ‘And laughed … So be it’. Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op. cit. (with additions) p.127.
40. Paul Rusesabagina, in Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op. cit. p.127.
41. Paul Rusesabagina, in Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op. cit. p.134.
42. Paul Rusesabagina, in Jeevan Vasagar, ‘From Four Star Sanctuary’, op.cit. p.4.
43. Pastor Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, in Philip Gourevitch, We Wish To Inform You, op. cit. p. 41.
44. ‘The call…voices’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Psyche: Invention of the Other’, in Reading de Man Reading, edited by Wlad Gadzich and Lindsay Waters, op.cit. p.62.
45. ‘The braided polyphony … voice’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Voice II’ in Points…, op.cit. p162.
46. ‘The music of voices …control’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Passages – From Traumatism to Promise’ in Points… op.cit.: 372-395, p.394. (Interview with Elisabeth Weber, originally broadcast in German translation – intercut with musical excerpts – in a radio program on Jacques Derrida in Hesse, by Hessischer Rundfunk, May 22, 1990; subsequently published in Spuren in Kunst und Gesellschaft, 34-35, October – December, 1990.)
47. ‘I listen … listen’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Passages – From Traumatism to Promise’, in Points… op. cit. p.395.
48. ‘Lonely Woman’, Ornette Coleman. Track # 1 on The Shape of Jazz to Come, Atlantic Recording Corporation, 1959. Again, I was unable to get permission to include the audio version of this song in my paper for this site. I hope the reader will seek it out for themselves. It was certainly an important part of its inspiration.
49. “A date discerns and concerns a place, it is a situation. It may give rise to calculations. But in the final analysis, it ceases to be calculable.” Jacques Derrida, ‘Shibboleth. For Paul Celan’ in Word Traces: Readings of Paul Celan, edited by Aris Fioretos, op.cit. p.52.
50. ‘He also knows … to him’. Martin Williams, liner notes, Ornette Coleman, The Shape of Jazz to Come, op.cit.
51. Cf. Martin Heidegger, ‘The Nature of Language’ in On The Way to Language. Translated by Peter D. Hertz (San Francisco: Harper and Row 1971): 57-108, p.88 and passim.
52. ‘An inheritance … conjuncture’. Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx. Translated by Peggy Kamuf (New York: Routledge, 1994) p.16.
53. ‘Whether … responsible’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Passages – From Traumatism to Promise’ in Points… op.cit. p.384.
54. ‘Between the idea … Shadow’. From T. S. Eliot ‘The Hollow Men’.
55. ‘The aleatory … calculus itself’. Jacques Derrida, ‘Psyche: Invention of the Other’ in Reading de Man Reading, edited by Wlad Godzich and Lindsay Waters, op.cit. p.341.
56. See Jacques Derrida, ‘The Law of Genre’. Translated by Avital Ronnell, Glyph 7 (1980): 176-232.
57. ‘Ladies … beginning’. Paul Celan, ‘Meridian’ in Selected Poems and Prose, op.cit. p.411.
58. ‘The end … from’. From T. S. Eliot Four Quartets, ‘Little Gidding’ pt.5.
59. ‘Topos research … U-topia’. Paul Celan, ‘Meridian’ in Selected Poems and Prose, op.cit. p.411.
60. “So, one has to, one fails to improvise {improviser il le faut, donc}.” Jacques Derrida, ‘Ja, or the faux-bond II’ in Points… op. cit.: 30-77, p.51.

References

Celan, Paul (2000). Selected Poems and Prose of Paul Celan. Translated by John Felstiner. (New York and London: W. W. Norton).
Coleman, Ornette (1959). The Shape of Jazz to Come, Atlantic Recording Corporation.
Concise Oxford Dictionary (1929). (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Derrida, Jacques (1976). Of Grammatology. Translated by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press).
Derrida, Jacques (1979). ‘Living On/Borderlines’ in Deconstruction and Criticism. Edited by Harold Bloom et al. (New York: Seabury Press):75-176.
Derrida, Jacques (1980). ‘The Law of Genre’. Translated by Avital Ronnell, Glyph:176-232.
Derrida, Jacques (1981). Dissemination. Translated by Barbara Johnson (Chicago: Chicago University Press).
Derrida, Jacques (1986). ‘Differance’ in Margins of Philosophy. Translated by Alan Bass (Chicago: Chicago University Press): 1-27.
Derrida, Jacques (1989). Mémoires for Paul de Man. Translated by Cecile Lindsay, Jonathan Culler, Eduardo Cadava, and Peggy Kamuf (New York: Columbia University Press).
Derrida, Jacques (1989). ‘Psyche: Invention of the Other’. Translated by Catherine Porter and Phillip Lewis. In Reading de Man Reading. Edited by Wlad Godzich and Lindsay Waters (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press): 25-65.
Derrida, Jacques (1992). ‘At This Very Moment in This Work Here I Am’. Translated by Ruben Berezdivin. In Re-Reading Levinas. Edited by Robert Bernasconi and Simon Critchley (Bloomington: Indiana University Press): 11-48.
Derrida, Jacques (1994). ‘The Spatial Arts: An Interview with Jacques Derrida’. In Deconstruction and the Visual Arts. Edited by Peter Brunette and David Wills (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press): 9-32.
Derrida, Jacques (1994). ‘Shibboleth. For Paul Celan’. In Word Traces: Readings of Paul Celan. Edited by Aris Fioretos (Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press): 3-72.
Derrida, Jacques (1994). Specters of Marx. Translated by Peggy Kamuf (New York: Routledge).
Derrida, Jacques (1995). Points… Interviews, 1974 – 1994. Edited by Elisabeth Weber (Stanford: Stanford University Press).
Derrida, Jacques (1998). Monolingualism of the Other: Or, The Prosthesis of Origin. Translated by Patrick Mensah (Stanford: Stanford University Press).
Gourevitch, Paul (2000). We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families. Stories from Rwanda. (London: Picador).
Heidegger, Martin (1971). ‘The Nature of Language’ in On The Way to Language. Translated by Peter D. Hertz (San Francisco: Harper and Row): 57-108.
Hopkins, Gerard Manley (1966). A Hopkins Reader (New York: Doubleday).
Kahn, Ashley (2002). A Love Supreme. The Story of John Coltrane’s Signature Album (New York and London: Penguin Books).
Lee, Dennis (1998). Body Music (Toronto: Anansi).
Pink Martini (2004). Hang on Little Tomato. Heinz Records. (www.pinkmartini.com)
Vasagar, Jeevan (2005). ‘From Four Star Sanctuary to Star of Holywood: The Hotel that Saved Hundreds’ in The Guardian, Wednesday, February 16, 2005. (http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,12589,1415517,00.html).

Geraldine Finn is Chair at the Department of Philosophy at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
You can contact her by:
e-mail: gfinn@ccs.carleton.ca

© Copyright Leeds 2017